Seabeach Dock

Seabeach Dock (Rumex pallidus

A sensitive plant species found at Tin Can Beach during a survey conducted by CBCL Limited in 2014 during an Environmental Impact Assessment is Seabeach dock (Rumex pallidus). Listed as S2S3 (ACCDC) and 3-Sensitive by NBDNR, an individual specimen was found growing close to the open water on an outcrop of bedrock, rooted into a crack in the rock. A member of the buckwheat family (Polygonaceae), seabeach dock is a plant of rocky beaches and coastal swamps including upper beach areas with cobble, gravel, shale, or shell and gravelly sand substrates. Associated species typically include seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens), curly dock (Rumex crispus) beach pea (Lathyrus japonicas), rugosa rose and dunegrass (Elymus mollis)

 

For more information, visit the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlifehttp://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/nhesp/species_info/nhfacts/rumpal.pdf

Canada Goose

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)

Canada Goose

Broadleaf Cattail

Common or Broadleaf Cattail (Typha latifolia)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Greg Marquis (date unknown)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Greg Marquis (date unknown)

Typha latifolia

Groundhog

Groundhog (Marmota monax)

Groundhog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Great Cormorant

Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted

Great Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (August 6, 2008)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (August 6, 2008)

Double-crested Cormorant

Three-spined Stickleback

Three-spined Stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, April 19, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, April 19, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Three-spined stickleback - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rainbow Smelt

Rainbow Smelt (Osmerus mordax)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, June 14, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, June 14, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Rainbow smelt

American Eel

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, May 18, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, May 18, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

American eel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Green Crab

Green Crab (Carcinus maenas)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, April 26, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, April 26, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Carcinus maenas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Winter Flounder

Winter Flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, Jun 8, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, Jun 8, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Winter flounder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tomcod

Tomcod (Microgadus tomcod)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, Jun 8, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson, Jun 8, 2012 at Courtenay Bay [Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted]

Microgadus tomcod - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Harbour Porpoise

Harbour Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted

Harbour porpoise - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Harbour Seal

Harbour Seal (Phoca vitulina)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Not Yet Submitted

Harbor seal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

White-tailed Deer

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (2010)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (2010)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (2009)

Photo: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (2009)

White-tailed deer

Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (2009)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Graeme Stewart-Robertson (2009)

Turkey Vulture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mallard

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

 

Mallards are the most common duck in Canada.

Flocks often feed in early morning and late afternoon in nearby harvested fields, returning to marshes and creeks to spend the night.

The flight is not particularly rapid. Hens have a loud quack; the drake's voice is a low-pitched kwek-kwek.

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Mallard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Black and Mallard Ducks: These two species often interbreed which can result in hybrids with any combination of mallard/black duck traits.

Red-breasted Merganser

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Red-breasted Merganser

Common Merganser

Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)

 

This species is larger than the red-breasted merganser, and is one of the largest of our ducks. It is one of the last to migrate South, and is more common than the red-breasted merganser on inland waters.

Flocks move in "follow the leader" style, low over the water. The only call seems to be a startled croak.

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Common Merganser

Common Goldeneye

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula

 

These are active, strong-winged fliers moving singly or in small flocks, often high in the air. Distinctive wing-whistling sound in flight has earned them the name of whistlers.

Goldeneyes generally migrate late in the season.

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Photo at Tin Can Beach: Adam Chateauvert (Feb 10, 2014)

Common Goldeneye
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